Top 12 Exotic Birds Of Dudhwa National Park

Alive with the songs and colours of more than 500 species of birds, Dudhwa National Park in the Terai region of Uttar Pradesh is truly a birder’s paradise. Here are 12 wonderful birds you can expect to see on a safari in the grasslands of Dudhwa on your #UnHoliday With TUTC.

A forest bird never wants a cage.

Dudhwa National Park is packed with several species of birds; an absolute treat on your TUTC holiday!

The grasslands of Dudhwa National Park are home to several threatened species, including elephants, one-horned rhinoceros, and the elusive tiger. Dudhwa is also the perfect winter residence for several species of birds, such as wagtails, minivets, finches, buntings and flycatchers. Wild ducks and teals fly in from Ladakh, Central Asia and Siberia to make Dudhwa their home for the winter. Dudhwa also has nine endangered bird species, namely the Black-Crested Baza, Great Indian and Indian Pied Hornbills, Laggar Falcon, Shaheen Falcon, Red-Headed Merlin, Osprey, Peafowl and the Bengal Florican. Read on for more about the vibrant birds you’re likely to find in the park.

#1 Egyptian Vulture

An adult Egyptian vulture

The endangered Egyptian vulture thrives in the wild, but often falls prey to electrocution, lead and pesticide poisoning

Call: Mostly silent, occasional high-pitched whistling

Egyptian Vultures are endangered and found in South-Western Europe, Northern Africa and Asia. They are carrion-eating, but also eat small birds, bird eggs, reptiles and small mammals. They roost in large trees, cliffs or buildings and their nests are generally an untidy platform of twigs. Wild vultures are rusty or brown, with a soiled plumage, while captive birds with limited access to soil are usually white. Females are larger and heavier than males, and both have yellow-orange facial skin. Though known to live for up to 37 years in captivity and 21 years in the wild, these birds often fall prey to electrocution, poisoning, lead and pesticide accumulation.

#2 Black-Hooded Oriole

A Black Hooded Oriole

The cheerful, yellow-bodied Black Hooded Oriole has an interesting legend associated with its name

Call: A whistled wheet and a short chatter

Bengali folklore tells the tale of the young wife of a goldsmith, who was tortured and starved by her mother-in-law. One day while cooking, unable to bear the hunger any longer, she began to eat the food she was cooking. Frightened by her mother-in-law who walked in and saw her eating, the young girl jumped into a nearby pond and drowned. Her sari, stained with yellow turmeric from the food, and her head black from soot, the girl was turned into a beautiful bird by a goddess, which is why this bird is also known as the ‘Benebou’, or goldsmith’s wife. As in the legend, the oriole is a brilliant yellow with a hooded black head. It feeds mainly on insects and fruits especially figs, and though it is a shy bird, the oriole is often found around human habitation.

#3 Drongo

A pair of Greater Racket-Tailed Drongos

Greater Racket-Tailed Drongos are excellent mimics; their whistling has earned them the title ‘kotwal’ or policeman!

Call: A range of calls that include imitating other birds

If you are in Dudhwa and see what look like two large bees pursuing a black bird, you’ve just spotted a Greater Racket-Tailed Drongo in mid-flight. A distinctive tail with two rackets at the end, the Greater Racket-Tailed Drongo is also an excellent mimic, and is known to make raptor calls to frighten away other birds and steal their prey. Their local name ‘Kotwal’ means ‘policeman’ or ‘guard’ and is based on the common whistling noise it makes. As a species, Drongos are insectivorous, diurnal and active well before dawn and late at dusk, and belong to the Dicruidae family. In Dudhwa, you see the Black, White Bellied, Greater Racket-Tailed and Ashy Drongos.

#4 Long-Tailed Minivet

Long Tailed Minivet

The Long-Tailed Minivet is nomadic in winter and feeds in parties, hunting insects.

Call: A high-pitched, metallic trill

The Long-Tailed Minivet belongs to the family of Campephagidae. Found in the geographic band that ranges from Afghanistan to China and Pakistan to Vietnam, these birds have a black hood, with blue-black upper-parts and a scarlet rump or crimson under-parts. The males have a shorter bill than the females, which have pale yellow under-parts. The Long-Tailed Minivet is nomadic in winter and feeds in parties, hunting insects.

#5 Spotted Owlet

A Spotted Owlet looks on

A Spotted Owlet breed successfully near human habitation, probably because of the availability of rodents.

Call: A harsh and loud chirurr-chirurr-chirurr that ends with a chirwak-chirwak

If you happen to disturb a Spotted Owlet from its daytime site, it will bob its head at you and stare, challengingly. This small and stocky grey-brown owl is entirely nocturnal and feeds on small insects and vertebrates. They call during dawn or just after the sunset, with a harsh and loud sound. They breed successfully near human habitation, probably because of the availability of rodents.

#6 Indian Roller

indian-roller

The Indian Roller is popularly known as Neelkanth, which means ‘blue throat’ and is the state bird of Andhra Pradesh, Odisha and Karnataka.

Call: A harsh crow-like chack sound

Named after the aerial acrobatics it performs, the Indian Roller is the state bird of Andhra Pradesh, Odisha and Karnataka. It has a brown breast, blue crown and vent, with feathers that are deep purplish blue with a band of pale blue. The tail is sky blue and Prussian blue, while the central feathers are dull green. They eat insects, arachnids, small reptiles and amphibians. Popularly known as Neelkanth, which means ‘blue throat’, it is attracted to fires, which artificial lights and moving tractors, all of which it uses for catching its prey. It is often seen plunging into open waters for a bath, and both male and female incubate their eggs for 17-19 days.

#7 Green Bee Eater

A Green Bee Eater

Green Bee Eaters are ground nesters, and dig tunnels of up to 5 feet long, and both sexes incubate clutches of 3-5 eggs.

Call: A nasal trill tree-tree-tree-tree

Green Bee Eaters are not very early risers. Colourful, with bright green and blue, they eat insects, especially bees, wasps and ants and remove the sting and break the exoskeleton by beating it on their perch, before swallowing the prey. Green Bee Eaters often dive into water and also take frequent sand baths. They are ground nesters, and dig tunnels of up to 5 feet long, and both sexes incubate clutches of 3-5 eggs.

#8 Indian Grey Hornbill

Indian Grey Hornbill

The Indian grey hornbill is found in deciduous forests woodlands, thorn forests and also seen in urban areas such as gardens, parks plantation etc; they generally nest in tree hollows.

Call: Squealing call, like that of a Black Kite

The grey feathers and the equally drab grey beak of the Indian Grey Hornbill allow it to remain inconspicuous in its surroundings. Usually found in pairs, the male has a casque which extends up to the point of curvature in its beak. Fruits, mollusks, scorpions, insects, small birds and reptiles are high on the Grey Hornbill’s diet, and their nesting habits are quite interesting. Usually made in the hollow of trees, the female seals the cavity of her nest using her own faeces, mud, cattle dung and tree bark, which the male brings to her. She remains there for an average of 76 days, while the male feeds her through the tiny opening. The Indian Grey Hornbill usually has two fledglings, which remain in the nest for about 13 days after the female emerges.

#9 Indian Peafowl

A Peacock trails its closed tail

Peacocks are known for their beautiful feathers, which begin to develop each February and moult by the end of August

Call: Loud Pia-ow or may-awe

The Indian Peafowl, the national bird of India, is a large and very brightly-coloured bird, with a diet that ranges from grains, fruits, snakes and lizards to small rodents. Peacocks are known for their beautiful feathers, which begin to develop each February and moult by the end of August. Males perform an elaborate mating dance for Peahens who have dull brown feathers, and a white underside.

#10 White-Throated Kingfisher

A pair of White-Throated Kingfishers

A pair of White-Throated Kingfishers feeding on their favourite prey.

Call: A chuckling chake-ake-ake-ake-ake

Found in Eurasia White-Throated Kingfishers eat small reptiles, rodents and birds. Their wings and tail are blue-back, while the head, shoulders and flanks are chestnut. The throat and breast are white. Like other kingfishers, they nest in tunnels made in earth banks, with a single clutch of 4-7 eggs. Chicks hatch in 22 days and fledge in 19.

#11 Oriental Honey Buzzard

The Oriental honey buzzard usually inhabit woodlands of varying climatic types in broad-leaved forests.

The Oriental honey buzzard usually inhabits woodlands of varying climatic types and have developed a  liking to broad-leaved forests.

Call: A high-pitched whistling sound.

The Oriental honey buzzard species is found in Asia, Indian Subcontinent, Southeast Asia, Philippines and Indonesia.The species in the northern region is migratory, arriving at the breeding grounds in the north in April and May and leaving again between August and October. They inhabit woodlands of varying climatic types in broad-leaved forests. The male is long-necked with a small blue-grey head with short head crest. The tail is long and darker with a white band. The back is brown and the underparts are paler. The female has brown head.

#12 Indian Pond Heron

The Pond Heron can be closely approached before they take to flight; a behaviour which has resulted in folk names and beliefs that the birds are short-sighted or blind.

The Pond Heron can be closely approached before they take to flight; a behaviour which has resulted in folk names and beliefs that the birds are short-sighted or blind.

Call: Squawking roh-roh-rohs or clucking go-go-gos

Just as the name suggests, the Pond Heron is usually found feeding at the edge of ponds and sometimes swim on water or fish from the air and land in deeper waters. They are also called paddy birds and found breeding in southern Iran and east to Pakistan, India, Burma, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. They can be closely approached before they take to flight; a behaviour which has resulted in folk names and beliefs that the birds are short-sighted or blind. Its appearance is transformed from their dull colours when they take to flight, with the white of the wings becoming very prominent.

Learn more about the wildlife of Dudhwa National Park in this interesting read:

#UnHoliday At Dudhwa: An Ultimate Encounter With The Wild

To know more about our #UnHoliday experience at Dudhwa, take a look at this video blog:

The Chronicles Of The Jungle, Unfurled

Spot these Birds and some more, as you #UnHoliday At Dudhwa with The Ultimate Travelling Camp!

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We set up luxury tents in Nagaland from November 29 to December 12, to coincide with the dates of the Hornbill festival. We are also even operational in Ladakh from the May 15 to October 10, so book yourself a glamping experience in the Himalayan mountains. Or delve into the hidden secrets of the wild, in the forest reserves of Dudhwa at The Jaagir Lodge from 19 December 2017 to 15 June 2018  call +91 801 090 2222 or write to us at info@tutc.com.

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1 Comment

  • comment-avatar
    MUKESH KUMAR April 10, 2018 (10:10 am)

    yes its very exciting i know about dhudhwa my farm is situated at dhudhwa border