What To Expect At The Hornbill Festival This Year? 

Come December and be ready to experience a 10-day extravaganza with The Ultimate Travelling Camp (TUTC) at this year’s Hornbill Festival in Nagaland. If you haven’t yet booked your slot, now is your time or else you’ll miss on the many fascinating things that goes on in this mega event.

The Naga tribes are all set to dazzle you at The Hornbill Festival this year. Are you ready for some action?

The Naga tribes are all set to dazzle you at The Hornbill Festival this year. Are you ready for some action?

The Hornbill Festival also known as the “Festival Of Festivals” celebrates the cultural phenomenon of the many tribes who inhabit the spectacular mountainous state of Nagaland. It all began in the year 2000 when the Government of Nagaland decided to showcase the state’s hidden cultural treasures. The Hornbill Festival has distinguished itself to being the epitome of celebrations; all bundled in one just package. And why not? After all where would you witness 16 different tribes showcasing their uniqueness amid a gala qof events? And while you’re still lost in your thoughts, let us mesmerise you with the beauty that Nagaland is.

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Nagaland – Switzerland Of The East

Nestled amidst lush green mountains and meadows, Nagaland is a heaven for those wanting to take a break from their mediocre lifestyle and seek a recluse close to nature.

Popularly known as the ‘Switzerland of the East’, Nagaland is an ideal destination for jungle camping, trekking and rock climbing.

Popularly known as the ‘Switzerland of the East’, Nagaland is an ideal destination for jungle camping, trekking and rock climbing.

Abundantly rich in flora and fauna, Nagaland boasts of a sub-tropical and sub-alpine climate with crisscrossing landscapes that always keeps you wanting for more. Now consider this: Scenic beauty or high rise? Exotic plants or cubicles? Fresh air or exhaust fumes? Warm wake-up calls from wild birds or your alarm clock? The choice is yours.

That was a bit about Nagaland, now let me tell you more about the Hornbill Festival and why it ought to be on your bucket list!

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The Hornbill Festival – FESTIVAL OF FESTIVALS

Nagaland is home to as many as 16 different tribes with each boasting of a rich cultural heritage – a melange of art, music, dance, history, folklores and cuisines; all unique to itself. There’s so much to these Naga tribes that it’d take you many months to visit each one of them individually; let alone knowing their day-to-day routine. TUTC does this for you in the Hornbill festival that brings all the 16 tribes together between December 1 and 10 each year, so you can have a gala time.

The Hornbill Festival owes its legacy to the Hornbill bird; a bird synonymous with all the Naga tribes, although the state bird of Nagaland is Blyth's tragopan

The Hornbill Festival owes its legacy to the Hornbill bird; a bird synonymous with all the Naga tribes, although the state bird of Nagaland is Blyth’s tragopan

Started with the motive of encouraging inter-tribal interactions and to promote the cultural heritage of Nagaland, Hornbill Festival grew from being a local state government sponsored event to being, as we prefer to call it, ‘The Cultural Ambassador of Nagaland’.

The annual Hornbill Festival is held 12 kilometres from Kohima; the capital of Nagaland at the Naga Heritage Village in Kisama. The venue where the festival is held is surrounded by huge green mountains illustrious of an artist’s imagination with flora honing its beauty.

Also Watch:

VIDEO: 10 Days Of The Hornbill Festival With TUTC

Celebrate Nagaland, Where Music Is A Way Of Life!

16 Gates for 16 Different Tribes

How exciting would it be to know that there would be 16 gates for 16 different tribes representing themselves at the venue? But wait until we spill the beans and tell you that all the 16 gates are representative of the tribes’ styles and no single gate is similar. How’s that for a grand entry into the oasis of the Naga lifestyle?

Opening Gates Into A Wonderland

Ok! So now that you have entered the lair of the Nagas, get ready to be welcomed by warm hospitality in their villages. Villages? Oh, yes! Behind every gate you will witness the quintessential daily life of the Naga tribe in a village setting that is uniquely reminiscent to each tribe. The traditionally built wooden houses with thatched roofs and intricately carved designs on the walls will give you a fair idea about the community residing in each village. Every tribe has a story to tell and behind every story is a parable associated with their past.

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Talk to these hospitable Nagas and they will convince you that life is all about working hard and partying even harder.

Talk to these hospitable Nagas and they will convince you that life is all about working hard and partying even harder.

An essential part of every Naga village is the ‘morung’. The morung was a self-governing body aimed at protecting the village from outside attacks that defends the village in times of crisis. A Morung is usually built near the village entrance; be ready to encounter one when you enter one.

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Rice Beer Is A Hit!

For those unaware, let me tell you that Nagaland is a dry state but you can try the Naga specialty – Rice Beer. Rice Beer is a locally brewed beer if you want to try something new. It was traditionally used to treat several ailments like loss of appetite, low nutrition and even dysentery.

Did you know: Rice Beer is synonymous with the Naga tribes and has played an integral part in their lives since times immemorial?)

Did you know: Rice Beer is synonymous with the Naga tribes and has played an integral part in their lives since times immemorial? Try one in their customised Naga Glass made of bamboo!

History suggests that brewing rice helped save food grains during poor harvest as the Rice Beer served as an alternative to normal meal. Moreover, the squeezed out remains of the rice was dried in the sun and was used to make porridge during poor harvest.

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Bhoot Jolokia – Even The Mightiest Crave To Conquer Her

Bhoot Jolokia or Ghost Pepper are the hottest chilli in the world and is 400 times hotter than the Tabasco sauce. Now it would come as a surprise to a many of you that at the Hornbill Festival, a spectacular Bhoot Jolokia eating competition is held on the 10th day, and beware: It is NOT for the faint hearted. With thousands of spectators, only a few brave hearts gather up the courage to conquer her. It is mostly the locals who dare to participate in this fiery contest. So what’s the deal? You have to eat maximum chillies in 20 seconds. Phew! For us who start tearing up after accidently chewing a piece of chilli, this will be a moment of teeth clenching and goose bumps.

Naga Chillies for all Spice Lovers - This takes some serious guts. A useful tip: Just don’t go nuts!

Naga Chillies for all spice lovers with some serious guts. A useful tip: Just don’t go nuts!

However, not everything at the Hornbill Festival is to freak you out. You can always participate in the Pineapple and pork eating competition, so you always have a shot at winning something!

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Naga Tribes – Adding Colours to Life

An indispensable trait in the life of a Nagamese is the way they dress up. Art and colour being a part of their lives is inseparable and can be largely noticed in everything they own.

An indispensable trait in the life of a Nagamese is the way they dress up. Art and colour being a part of their lives is inseparable and can be largely noticed in everything they own.

Art is a form of expression for the Naga tribes whose colourful clothes is always buoyed with decorative patterns and jewellery. Typical Naga jewelleries are heavy and bright consisting of feathers, bones, shells, claws, ivory, beads and wood that is symbolic of the state’s rich history and cultural heritage. In fact, giving a tough competition to Naga women are Naga men who equally sport these exotic ornaments adding a dash to their personalities.

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Clothes That Actually Mean Something For A Change!

Culture and Tradition is deeply rooted in the Nagas’ daily lives and this is reflected in the way they dress. A shawl is an important item that is proudly worn by the Nagas. They differ from tribe to tribe and even from community to community. For instance, the shawl adorned by a person of a higher status in the community is more vibrant with shells and distinctive patterns sewn on them than those worn by an ordinary person of the clan.

Traditional costumes worn by Naga tribespeople is what distinguishes them from the crowd.

Traditional clothing worn by Naga tribes distinguishes them from the crowd – take that shawl for instance.

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Certain shawls embroidered with figures of animals such as Mithun (Bovine) represents the wealth of the person. Whereas the Tiger and Elephant represent the person’s hunting skills.

Naga headgears vary from tribe to tribe and ‘beauty’ is the only feature common in them.

Naga headgears vary from tribe to tribe; each vividly beautiful.

Another striking feature about the Naga tribe is how Naga men sport distinctive headgears. It leaves us wondering how they manage such weight on their heads. To be honest, headgears are certainly a style statement for the Nagamese. On the eve of important festivals, the Nagas wear headgears that are made from woven un-dyed cane base fixed over a mat of thin red and yellow-dyed cane. It is sewn with goat hair and embellished with boar tusk. Well, that’s something!

Conglomerate of Entertainment

A museum tells you stories of the past – bygone histories, heroic tales, art, culture – of all that perished with time. But who needs a museum when you can witness the past in all its grandeur for real? Thanks to the perseverance of the Nagas at the Hornbill Festival, you will witness everything with a twist of luxury sprinkled over it.

Here’s a list of the many things that you will witness when you stay with TUTC, because now is the time!

#1. Naga Wrestling

Ever seen athletes grapple each other at an Olympic event? Maybe only on television, correct?

It is indeed very rare that you get to watch real Naga warriors engage in a Naga wrestling match – you can cheer for them too!

It is indeed very rare that you get to watch real Naga warriors in their best battles!

#2. Of Beauty Pageants

women-in-nagaland at hornbill festival

Needless to say, Nagamese women are beautiful! Watch them on the ramp boasting their traditional attires. It shows how the tribes have accepted modernization without losing their roots.

Yes, you read that right! There is a Miss Nagaland beauty pageant contest held on the side-lines of the Hornbill Festival! Young women of Nagaland compete to win the Crown of Miss Nagaland. Ever fancied watching a beauty contest? This is your chance.

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#3. Motor Rally

One of the most spectacular and most awaited event at the Hornbill Festival is the International Hornbill Motor Rally. Bikers from all over the world compete. 12 destinations in Nagaland are covered in this major event of the Hornbill Festival.

#4. A Plethora of Culture

Dance and music are synonymous with the Naga tribe as is evident in most of their festivals. Celebrations are incomplete without tribespeople dancing to the tunes of simple musical instruments combined with songs that uplift the spirit. Therefore to imagine the Hornbill Festival without the Naga dance and music would be sheer foolishness!

Hornbill festival- The vibrant and unique fiesta of Nagaland!

A dance performance by the Naga people sporting traditional costumes, a vivid headgear and a spear while executing acrobatics is all the motivation you need to get into the Hornbill mood.

Music is a way of the Nagas to convey their rich history; all scattered with stories of gallant warriors, and folklores of how they fought against all odds and emerged triumphant, interspersed with stories of love and romance. Simple yet energetic instruments such as cup violins, Tati (single-string fiddle), bamboo flutes and trumpets are at the heart of Naga folk music.

Also witness the sacrificial and fire-making rituals during the day, and as temperatures dip in the evening, delve in some soul soothing music, and songs performed by our very own Naga artists.

Also Read:

Celebrate Nagaland, Where Music Is A Way Of Life!

Celebrate Nagaland, Where Music Is A Way Of Life!

#5. Battle Of The Chords

If you thought, Hornbill Festival was only about traditional music, think again -it hosts its own rock concert. Witness the electrifying battle of the chords as top bands from across the country compete in one of the most epic musical saga. Also, get ready to be thrilled by your favourite international bands! What???? YES!

‘Hornbill Rock Concert’ is not only the best in India but also the longest rock concert.

‘Hornbill Rock Concert’ is not only the best in India but also the longest rock concert.

#6. Night Markets

As a finger rule, shopping is permitted in Nagaland only during daytime which means the nightlife is pretty much sombre. But this rule gets a relaxation during the Hornbill Festival, just so that you can do some last minute shopping after your day long sojourn at the Hornbill Festival.

Held outside the event venue in the state capital Kohima, and organised by the Kohima Chamber of Commerce, the night markets have everything in store for you right from authentic Naga food to spices, from bamboo handicrafts to beads and jewellery, and from Naga shawls to garments and handbags. Many authors from Nagaland choose the eve of Hornbill Festival to release their books. So it shouldn’t surprise you when you meet one at the night markets. Booklovers, are you listening?

Meet The Tribes

All said and done, it makes no sense to visit the Hornbill Festival if you don’t know a thing or two about the 16 Naga Tribes.

All said and done, it makes no sense to visit the Hornbill Festival if you don’t know a thing or two about the 16 Naga Tribes.

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Naga tribes were animists and enmity brewed among these tribes to such an extent that headhunting of other tribe members became a regular affair often afflicted with pride. However, after the advent of the British, most Nagas embraced Christianity. Nagas are mostly migrants who have immigrated into Nagaland since times immemorial and each tribe has its own distinct language; although they are equally well versed in both English and Hindi. So striking a conversation wouldn’t be that hard.

Also Read:

15 Fascinating Facts About Naga Tribes

Naga Tribes: 15 Fascinating Facts We Bet You Didn’t Know!

#1. Yimchunger

The word Yimchunger means “the ones who have reached their place of choice”. Have no doubt about that since they are one of the major contributors to the Hornbill Festival. Deep-rooted in culture, they sing hymns and have songs devoted to their craft. Yimchungers celebrate the Metumniu festival between August 4 and 8 every year, after the harvest of millet. During this occasion, prayers are recited for the departed souls and the ceremony is teary eyed for those families who have lost their dear ones during that year.

#2. Angami

The Angami tribe wear dresses with patterns of red and yellow coloured bands designed on a black cloth.

The Angami tribe wear dresses with patterns of red and yellow coloured bands designed on a black cloth.

Formerly belonging to the warrior race, Angami, now mostly depend on agriculture and livestock-rearing. They practice terraced wet-rice cultivation which allows them to cultivate in the same land every year. The Angami tribe celebrate the Sekrenyi festival which falls in the month of February. Youngsters sing traditional songs throughout the day. It is known as the festival of purification with feasting being an important aspect.

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#3. Ao

A reenactment of a war or a tribal dance? Well, find out yourself

A re-enactment of a war or a tribal dance? Well, find out yourself!

The Aos were the first to embrace Christianity in 1872 and receive western education, thus paving way to excel in many fields in comparison to the other Naga tribes. The Aos celebrate the agrarian festival of Moatsu Mong between 1st and 3rd May after sowing season is complete and seeds begin to germinate. This period is marked by singing songs in the praise of warriors and lovers, while dancing and merry making. Traditionally, the festival also involves making the best rice-beer! Cheers to that!

#4. Chakhesang

chakhesang-girls-Smile... Because Hornbill Festival and Happiness are two sides of the same coin

Smile… Because Hornbill Festival and Happiness are two sides of the same coin

The Chakhesang tribe celebrate two major festivals annually – the 4-day long Tsukhenye Festival, in the month of May, and the 11-day long, Sukrenye Festival in the month of January. On the first day of the Tsukhenye Festival, the village priest sacrifices the first rooster that crowed in the morning – thus marking the beginning of the festival. Similarly, all men arrive at a well early that morning and purify themselves by bathing. During the Sukrenye Festival, boys and girls are sanctified through religious rituals and prayers, and the first five days of the festival are spent in various preparations for the next six days that follow.

#5. Konyak

Konyaks practiced head-hunting on an extensive scale and were counted among the most feared warrior tribes.

Konyaks practiced head-hunting on an extensive scale and were counted among the most feared warrior tribes.

The Konyaks are one of the largest Naga tribes and are easily recognisable because of pierced ears and tattoos all over the face, chest, arms and calves. The Konyaks were among the last Naga tribes to embrace Christianity and were known for their fierce warrior skills. They observe Aoleang Monyu in mid-April after the sowing of seeds and welcome the New Year when flowers begin to bloom.

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#6. Kachari

kachari-2-Because a reason to not celebrate is never off the limits for Nagamese people

Kachari women dancing to a music they love.

Folklores suggests that Kacharis are descendants of Bangla Raja (Earthquake God) and the divine bird, Arikhidima. The Kacharis celebrate a number of festivals throughout the year but their main festival is Bushu or Bushu Jiba, celebrated in the last week of January. Bushu is a post-harvest festival, and is celebrated after the grains are stored in granaries on an auspicious full-moon’s night. They also have a dance form that is complex and is strictly dependent.

#7. Chang

chang Once feared by all for their hunting skills, the Naga tribes are now mostly dependent on agriculture

Once feared by all for their hunting skills, these Naga tribes are now mostly dependent on agriculture and are very hospitable

Chang is known to be derived from ‘chognu’, meaning banyan tree. It came to being after a mythical Banyan tree was believed to grow at the now abandoned, Changsang village where the Chang tribe originally hailed from. The festival of Naknyulem is celebrated in the month of July, symbolised by a number of games such as top spinning, high jump, long jump, tug-of-war, climbing of an oiled pole, and jumping and grapping big lumps of well cooked meat hung in rows along a bamboo rope. One distinct feature about this festival is that there is no dancing involved, despite the many activities.

#8. Khiamniungan

During Miu, the maternal uncle offers special prayers to the deity and wishes for his nephew and niece’s good health, prosperous life and power over enemies.

During Miu, the maternal uncle offers special prayers to the deity and wishes for his nephew and niece’s good health, prosperous life and power over enemies.

Khiamniungan are one of the major Naga tribes of Nagaland, and inferences drawn from their folklores says Khiamniungan means “source of great waters”, their place of origin. Khiamniungans celebrate ‘Miu’ in the month of May, in order to kindle relations between the maternal uncle and his sister’s children.

#9. Kuki

kuki-1-1024x680

Members of the Kuki tribe put up a grand show at the Hornbill Festival

The Kukis owing to British harassment, fought alongside the Japanese and the Indian National Army during World War 2 to overthrow the British. One of the major festivals celebrated by the Kuki tribe is ‘Mimkut’ in the month of January. Mimkut is a harvest festival with an interesting story behind it. It is said that people carried out sacrifices as an offering to ‘Thilha’ (Demon) in order to appease. However, at the same time they also believed in the existence of a ‘Chung Pathen’ (Heavenly God). In order to win over the favours of both the Demon and God, the ‘Thempu’ (village medicine man) would sacrifice fowls followed by a series of rituals and prayers.

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#10. Pochury

pochury-1

Enough of trumpets and clarinets! Time to listen to the Tütü Khei

The Pochury tribe was formed recently after the unification of the erstwhile three warring tribes – Kupo, Kuchu and Khuri – who fought viciously against each other and united only after their elders negotiated for peace. One of their main festivals is the ‘Yimshe’ on October 5, every year marking the beginning of a new harvest season.

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#11. Lotha

lotha-1 Nagas' tribal dance are often ways of telling stories and worry not if you do not understand the context because gestures and emotions are sure to get the better of you

Nagas’ tribal dance are often ways of telling stories and legends of their ancestors

The Lotha tribe celebrate the post-harvest festival of ‘Tokhu Emong’ on November 7, annually. It’s an occasion of joy and fervour as friends, relatives and neighbours visit each other’s homes & celebrate after a year of toiling in the farms.

#12. Sangtam

sangtam - All behold! The Sangtam tribes has arrived!

All behold! The Sangtam tribe has arrived!

The Sangtam community mostly relies on agriculture and practice shifting cultivation. The Sangtams despite embracing Christianity have held on to their traditional beliefs. They celebrate 12 festivals all-round the year with the main being, ‘Mongmong’. It revolves around worshipping the God of the House and the three cooking stones in the fireplace.

#13. Phom

During Monyu, male members of the family shower their love and affection on their daughters and sisters and gift them the purest of rice beer and specially prepared food.

During Monyu, male members of the family shower their love and affection on their daughters and sisters and gift them the purest of rice beer and specially prepared food.

The Phom tribe primarily relies on agriculture and they practice the slash-and-burn technique of cultivation. The Phoms have four major festivals: Monyu, Moha, Bongvum and Paangmo. Among these, the prominent is the Monyu which is celebrated in the first week of April to welcome the New Year. A day or two before the Monyu festival, log drums beat in a distinct tune, synchronized specifically for the occasion.

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#14. Sumi

There’s no room for doubt that the Hornbill Festival is going to blow your mind. Look at them move!

The Sumis celebrate many festivals throughout the year, however, they have two major festivals: Tuluni and Ahuna. Tuluni is celebrated in the month of July and drinking Rice Beer served in a goblet made with the leaf of plantain is customary. On the other hand, to-be-married couples celebrate with each other’s family. The groom visits the bride’s family with his family and an exchange of packed food and meat is made. Ahuna on the other hand signifies the season’s harvest during Thanksgiving and feasting on the season’s harvested rice cooked in bamboo segments.

#15. Rengma

According to oral traditions passed, slavery was once practiced among the Rengmas, however, by the time the British came, the practice of slavery was fast declining with no records of modern slavery till date.

The Rengmas celebrate the festival of Ngadah towards the end of November which marks the end of the agricultural year. It is a festival of rejoicing and thanksgiving.

The Rengmas celebrate the festival of Ngadah towards the end of November which marks the end of the agricultural year. It is a festival of rejoicing and thanksgiving.

#16. Zeme / Zeliang

The Zeme tribe celebrate the festival of ‘Milei Ngi’ celebrated during the year end between December 19 and 21. On the first day, the best agricultural produce is offered in temples; while the second day is reserved for traditional games and sports. The winners have to invite others to their houses to celebrate. This occasion witnesses feasting on meat and Rice Beer. On the third day, singing and dancing are performed to seek the blessings of the elders. A bunch of thread is tied on the wrists of the children marking the blessings.

Also Read:

All You Need To Know About The Naga Tribes – Part 1

VIDEO: 10 Days Of The Hornbill Festival With TUTC

All You Need To Know About The Naga Tribes – Part 2

All You Need To Know About The Naga Tribes – Part 2

Experience The Hornbill Festival Differently With TUTC

Glamping (luxury camping) with TUTC in The Kohima camp at Nagaland commences from November 29 to December 12 every year to coincide with Hornbill Festival.

Visit Nagaland, Meet The Naga Tribes!

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A glimpse inside TUTC's luxurious glamping tent - Staying in the forest shall not be uncomfortable anymore!

A glimpse inside TUTC’s luxurious glamping tent at the Kohima Camp in Nagaland- Staying in the forest shall not be uncomfortable anymore!

A local trip to the Angami village of Khonoma is arranged for you. Here, you get to see Nagas carrying out their daily chores, and experience life the way they do. It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity to taste their meal – cooked by the Nagas themselves and to experience the world from their eyes.

Also Read:

The Hornbill Festival In A Nutshell

The Hornbill Festival In A Nutshell

Nagaland is a land full of wonders and so is its food. A typical Nagamese meal consists of rice, boiled vegetables, fermented bamboo shoots, boiled soya beans, animal protein, roasted and smoked pork meat, bitter melon, soup and chutney – of course, nothing less could be expected of a state boasting an amalgamation of 16 Naga tribes.

Get ready to treat yourself to a succulent Naga meal; the powerhouse of all the Naga tribes

Get ready to treat yourself to a succulent Naga meal; the powerhouse of all the Naga tribes with TUTC

Pro Tip: There aren’t many restaurants in Nagaland because Naga people prefer homemade food, and those operational will offer you typical Chinese or Indian food. To taste the authentic Naga cuisine, TUTC is your best bet.

Also Read:

All You Need To Know About Nagaland Cuisine

All You Need To Know About Nagaland Cuisine

Set in the middle of the jungle amidst a backdrop of mountains and under the open starry sky, this tent is all you need to experience the pure pleasures of glamping

Set in the middle of the jungle amidst a backdrop of mountains and under the open starry sky, this tent is all you need to experience the pure pleasures of glamping

Also Read:

How TUTC Adds Luxury To Camping

How TUTC Adds Luxury To Camping

It is only at TUTC’s Kohima Camp that you get to taste authentic Naga cuisine prepared by world-class chefs, followed by beautiful bonfires around the campsite. Go glamping with TUTC at Nagaland and mingle with the local community on a level that is unparalleled.

Come, experience the Hornbill Festival, and indulge all that Nagaland and its people have to offer at TUTC’s Kohima Camp.


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We set up luxury tents in Nagaland from November 29 to December 12, to coincide with the dates of the Hornbill festival. We are also even operational in Ladakh from the May 15 to October 10, so book yourself a glamping experience in the Himalayan mountains. Or delve into the hidden secrets of the wild, in the forest reserves of Dudhwa at The Jaagir Lodge from 19 December 2017 to 15 June 2018  call +91 801 090 2222 or write to us at info@tutc.com.

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About The Author

sumit

Sumit Roy is an Editor, Writer, Researcher, Translator and Proofreader at Aatman Innvoations Pvt. Ltd. When not working, he likes to read, write, watch movies or series, play computer games or even better – procrastinate. He believes in free basic education for all and thinks that capitalism first and socialism next can change this world for better.

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